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Using prescription medicine properly is important for the safety and health of those in your family. Follow these guidelines to ensure safety:

  • Only take medication that is prescribed to you.
  • Make a list of medications you are taking now. Include the dose, how often you take them, the imprint on each tablet or capsule, and the name of the pharmacy. The imprint can help you identify a drug when you get refills.
  • Any time that your medications change, change your list, too. Double-check the imprints on the tablets and capsules.
  • Also list your medication and food allergies, and any over-the-counter medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements or herbal products that you take regularly.
  • Keep medications in their original containers. Many pills look alike, so by keeping them in their original containers, you will know which is which and how to take them.
  • Never take someone else’s medication. You don’t know if it will interact with your medications, the dose may be wrong for you, or you may be allergic to it.
  • Read the label every time you take a dose to make sure you have the right drug and that you are following the instructions.
  • Turn on the lights to take your medications. If you can’t see what you’re taking, you may take the wrong thing.
  • Don’t store medications in the bathroom medicine cabinet or in direct sunlight. Humidity, heat and light can affect medications’ potency and safety.
  • Don’t chew, crush or break any capsules or tablets unless instructed. Some long-acting medications are absorbed too quickly when chewed, which could be unsafe. Other medications either won’t be effective or could make you sick.
  • To give liquid medication, use only the cup or other measuring device that came with it. Dosing errors can happen if you use a different cup or if you use the cup with other liquids because the cups often are different sizes or have different markings. Also, household teaspoons and tablespoons are not very accurate, which is important with some medications. Your pharmacist may give you a special oral syringe instead.